Author Archives: socialworknz

About socialworknz

I'm a social work researcher in Aotearoa New Zealand

Interprofessional supervision: a matter of difference

A new article by Allyson Davys With its origins grounded in the apprenticeship tradition it is perhaps not surprising that social work adheres to a model of supervision where both supervisor and supervisee are social workers and where it is … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Evaluating social work supervision

A new article by Allyson Davys, Janet May, Beverly Burns, Michael O’Connell The question of whether the practice of professional supervision is effective, and how its effectiveness can be measured, has been debated by both social work and other professions. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Critical conversations: Social workers’ perceptions of the use of a closed Facebook group as a participatory professional space.

  Deb Stanfield  The use of social media in our world today continues to excite and confound us; despite its significant presence in our everyday lives, we are still grappling with its true nature and coming to terms with its … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Social workers’ experiences with whistleblowing

Whistleblowing in social work has not received a great deal of attention in practice or research and no Aotearoa New Zealand research was located when Sally Raymond an Aotearoa New Zealand mental  health social worker began her study.  Our recent … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Call for papers: Women in social work

Special issue proposal: Women in social work- practice, policy, education and research Kia ora, Talofa lava, Kia orana, Mälö e lelei, Fakaalofa lahi atu, Bula vinaka, Namaste, Malo ni, Halo ola keta, Mauri, Fakatalofa atu, Kia ora and Warm Pacific … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What’s your agenda? Reflective supervision in community-based child welfare services in Aotearoa

Matt Rankine A new article by Matt Rankine reports on findings of a qualitative research project exploring supervision in non- statutory child welfare agencies in Aotearoa New Zealand. Matt notes that the contracting environment  of community-based child welfare services (CCW) in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Harmful supervision

“Supervision is an important component of professional learning, growth, and development in the helping professions. It is at the heart of professional practice on a career-long basis for some professions and a significant element in education and internship for others. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 4 Comments

Decision –making variability in child welfare project: A research update

Emily Keddell and Ian Hyslop  Decision making in child protection practice is a complex process which can have significant implications for children and families in Aotearoa NZ. Emily Keddell and Ian Hyslop are currently engaged in a small mixed methods … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Questioning the uncritical acceptance of neuroscience in child and family policy and practice: A review of challenges to the current doxa

In January I asked  in my post on RSW Blog  ‘Brains, biology and tests for future burdenhood‘ Who hasn’t seen the brains? The luridly coloured images of two children’s brains, side by side. Presented as cast iron evidence of the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

To post or not to post? Perceptions of the use of a closed Facebook group as a networked public space

Neil Ballantyne, Simon Lowe, Liz Beddoe  The expansion of social media is associated with rapid growth in digital spaces for civic engagement and deliberative democratic discussion.  Yet while these networked public spaces offer many possibilities for engagement and interaction, the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments