Category Archives: Uncategorized

“The tip of the iceberg”: Multiple thresholds in schools’ detecting and reporting of child abuse and neglect

Irene de Haan, Eileen Joy, Liz Beddoe and Sark Iam School of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work, University of Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand Schools and school  principals in particular have a very important role to play in the detection … Continue reading

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Feeling Lucky: The Serendipitous Nature of Field Education

Kathryn Hay, Jane Maidment, Neil Ballantyne, Liz Beddoe and Shayne Walker A timely 3-year multi-phase project ‘Enhancing readiness to practise’ is the first large study of social work education to be funded in Aotearoa New Zealand. The enhanceR2P research project … Continue reading

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Social Work Education in Aotearoa New Zealand: Building a Profession

Social work in the Pacific nation Aotearoa New Zealand has developed within a unique cultural and socio-political context. An essentially western model of social work developed sixty years ago in a colonial state which imposed British education, policing, child welfare, … Continue reading

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A call for papers : Supervision in social work

Supervision in social work: Supporting and developing practice from education to leadership Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work- an open access journal.  Editors: Liz Beddoe, Associate Professor of Social Work, University of Auckland, New Zealand- about Liz. David Wilkins,  Senior Lecturer, Children’s Social Care … Continue reading

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Readiness to practice social work in Aotearoa New Zealand: perceptions of students and educators

Liz Beddoe, Kathryn Hay, Jane Maidment, Neil Ballantyne and Shayne Walker New research article The readiness to practice of newly qualified social workers in Aotearoa New Zealand is a contested subject. In recent years, criticism by public figures including government … Continue reading

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Using Facebook in social work assessment: An unethical practice or an effective tool in child protection?

Tarsem Singh Cooner  and Liz Beddoe  Social media has redefined how we are able to keep in touch with family and friends, find people and relate to others. Research has shown that social workers have been using social media, both … Continue reading

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Research on school based social work in Aotearoa New Zealand- new publications

 Liz Beddoe and Irene de Haan Over the last two years we have been exploring schools’ responses to child abuse and neglect. In our earlier post we shared our initial findings about school social workers’ experiences. We were interested in … Continue reading

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Interprofessional supervision: a matter of difference

A new article by Allyson Davys With its origins grounded in the apprenticeship tradition it is perhaps not surprising that social work adheres to a model of supervision where both supervisor and supervisee are social workers and where it is … Continue reading

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Evaluating social work supervision

A new article by Allyson Davys, Janet May, Beverly Burns, Michael O’Connell The question of whether the practice of professional supervision is effective, and how its effectiveness can be measured, has been debated by both social work and other professions. … Continue reading

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Critical conversations: Social workers’ perceptions of the use of a closed Facebook group as a participatory professional space.

  Deb Stanfield  The use of social media in our world today continues to excite and confound us; despite its significant presence in our everyday lives, we are still grappling with its true nature and coming to terms with its … Continue reading

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